Self-Portrait

 

About me

Photographer, Music Lover, and Record Collector!

Things I dig… Photographing live shows, the sound that comes out of my Leo’s 1983 Gibson Les Paul, spending the day at a record shop flipping through vinyl, watching and analyzing Kubrick films, Tribute bands, pinball, exploring the Pacific NW, Powell’s Books, the passion black metal fans have for the music they would die for, dive bars, good tattoo work, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, IBC Black Cherry Cola, photographing my Aussie (Lola) chasing and catching the frisbee in the air, the burgers at Noble Rot in Portland, all things Lemmy.

I am primarily a Wedding and Portrait photographer and I spend most of my time shooting in that world (RayLundrigan.photography), but in my free time, I like to go back to my roots, which is concert photography. My love for photography was mostly shaped by my love of music, at least initially. My photography career began by going to see bands and learning how to use my camera in typically bad lighting scenarios, but it was a world I understood.

 

BELOW ARE A FEW OF THE MILESTONES THAT SHAPED MY LOVE FOR MUSIC…

    • My love for music began in the early 1970’s when my parents bought me a Beatles record – it was actually a double album called Rock & Roll. It was purchased in Spain and contains songs like Back in the USSR, Get Back and Drive my Car. I still have this album in my collection.
    • The next few records I fell in love with were Chuck Berry’s London Sessions (which my dad had on a reel-to-reel Akai system), Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Greatest Hits,  and a K-Tel compilation record that had songs like Charlie Brown and Blue Moon.
    • The next step in my music development came in 1978 when I went over to a friend’s house and he had a Kiss poster (Destroyer) above his bed and was playing Pink Floyd’s The Wall. That Kiss poster was scary and intriguing all at the same time. It was then that I realized that music was not just audio based – it had a look as well. Music now had visuals for me. I spent the next few hours listening to The Wall (over and over) and analyzing the gatefold while filling my mind with the artwork that accompanied that sound. I think this is why I love film scores so much today because a precise sound played over specific frames in a movie can make or break the mood the director is trying to convey. Imagine if Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining didn’t have a score behind it… Well, it would still be an amazing film but the score adds so much emotion to it. Fractional differentiation became a thing for me because of this score.
    • The first album (on cassette) I ever purchased myself was AC/DC’s Highway to Hell and it was bought at Mirabelli’s in the Park Lane Mall in Reno, NV. I spent a lot of time flipping through records in this store over the next few years. 
    • My mom was a huge music fan and taught me a lot about the history of where the music I was listening to came from. In the early 80’s I was really into bands like AC/DC, Judas Priest, Motorhead, Iron Maiden, Metallica, The Scorpions, and Van Halen but my mom made sure to let me know where the roots of all these bands came from. One night, while I was listening to AC/DC’s ‘If You Want Blood, You’ve Got It,’ my mom came into my room with a stack of records under her arm. The one that really struck a chord was John Lee Hooker’s ‘Endless Boogie’ because I then realized where AC/DC’s riffs came from. She also put on a Little Richard album, which was mind-blowing to me. Man, the energy that came through those speakers was massive. Throughout the years she educated me on music through the sounds of artists like Billie Holiday, T-Bone Walker, Muddy Waters, Robert Johnson, Elvis Presley (and where his sounds came from), as well as albums like The Copulatin’ Blues, The Last Waltz, and a ton of Swing compilations. Needless to say that my musical tastes are varied but my mom definitely taught me the difference between Street and Pop.
    • My parents allowed me to go to my first concert in 1982, which was Ozzy Osbourne with Axe as the openers. This was right after Randy Rhoads died so I saw Ozzy with Brad Gillis. It was both a scary and electric experience. The ticket to the show was $9.50 and I bought a t-shirt for $8.00. That was the beginning of my concert-going lifestyle. Over the next few months I saw Ted Nugent with Blackfoot, Cheap Trick with Payola, and ZZ-Top with Quiet Riot. I was officially hooked on live music! Oh wait, my second concert was actually Chuck Berry at the MGM Hotel in Reno. My dad took me and my friend Lance. I was so surprised that there were so many “bikers” at this show – I was not expecting this but it eventually made sense. Man, was that a rowdy show!
    • It only made sense that years later, in Las Vegas, I would play in a few bands (Constant Moving Party and Scrubs) for about five years. The music scene in Vegas was pretty damn amazing back then. All the bands supported each other and there were bars and venues a-plenty for every band to get gigs multiple times a week. A lot more on this topic in a future blog post
    • Regarding photography and bands, my first show with a camera was The Bronx and The Killers in Las Vegas. It was 2003. I didn’t care at all about The Killers, I was there for The Bronx so I only have photos of them. And, it wasn’t even my camera… a girl that I worked with had some inexpensive point-n-shoot and she let me use it for the night. At this point I had been dabbling in photography since 1995, but not bands. I blame The Bronx for this addiction!
    • So, here I am now living in the Pacific NorthWest just a couple minutes away from a lot of venues so now it is just time to get out there and do what I love!

 

That is pretty much it (in a nutshell). Feel free to reach out to say hi, comment on a post, or let me know about a cool band I should go see.

Cheers,